The Basement

Right now this seems to be mostly pictures of actresses and things about '90s rock music. It could change.
Here’s my review of A Most Wanted Man, a film I liked very much. 

Here’s my review of A Most Wanted Man, a film I liked very much. 

"One of the things that was great for David Byrne when we did Stop Making Sense was that David really got to design the lighting for the show—and by extension for the movie. He hadn’t got to do everything he wanted to do lighting wise with the stage show because of the limitations of technology at that point. But David got a chance to work with Jordan Cronenweth who shot Blade Runner and was a great master of American cinematography, and he could do all the little tweakings and brushstrokes that he had dreamed of doing with the stage show. […] It’s great working with [Cronenweth] because he’s an absolute tight-ass perfectionist. You can’t get Jordan to back away from anything he’s doing until he’s got it perfect, and that can be exasperating because you’ve got one eye on the clock and you’re desperate to get moving. But then when you see the dailies and you see the extra level Jordan was taking it to when he was driving you nuts, you go, ‘Thank God he did it.’ He’s a painstaking artist.”

"I’d just as soon it didn’t occur to people that they’re watching a concert, but rather a band performing without the distancing factor of it being an event that happened once. That’s why there’s no audience in the film until the very end. I thought it was important if the film was to be as effective for filmgoers as it was for me watching the concert. I wanted to capture the energy and the flow and that unrelenting progression of music."

"We were minutely prepared. David had storyboarded the concert in a series of close shots. Not for the film, but for a tour. From this storyboard, I started to develop a model of the film, which by the way never stopped being modified. I worked closely with my visual advisor Sandy McLeod, who made sure I was in constant contact with the Talking Heads while they were on tour. I traveled with them myself for one week in Texas, then, before our concert, I followed all their performances on the West Coast. So on D-Day, I had a precise idea about the best camera placements. Having said that, 50 percent of the shots were conceived on the spot. […] This was the first multiple-camera situation I’d ever been in. The first night was pretty disastrous. Suddenly it was all happening, and all the preparation and planning was put up against the reality of the show. Cameras ran out of film, the band was real nervous and uptight having cameras stuck in their faces. We kept getting each other in the background of shots too much. It was a mess, but a superb camera rehearsal. The next three nights were spectacular." — Jonathan Demme on Stop Making Sense

(Source: strangewood, via polyhymnia)

When I was 22, I thought that I deserved success just because I wanted it, and not because I’d actually earned it. If I had sold one of those books, I would have thought that the writing life was going to be an easy one, like living inside a bouncy castle, with no sharp edges anywhere. By the time I sold the book, I’d done a lot more living—I’d gone to graduate school to study writing more earnestly, moved in with my boyfriend, married my boyfriend, had a bunch of jobs, made new friends, moved out of New York and then back—and when it happened, it made sense. I had done all the work necessary to make it possible.

The Vacationers by Emma Straub

I read The Vacationers in a day, but that’s not a criticism. Emma Straub’s novel of Americans vacationing in Mallorca goes down smoothly by design, as if it were made to be read next to a pool on a warm afternoon. The two week vacation throws the future of the Post family into sharp relief; the plot revolves around whether or not Franny will forgive her husband Jim for a career-ending infidelity. Teenage daughter Sylvia, fleeing a social networking humiliation back home in New York, is preoccupied with her handsome Spanish tutor while older son Bobby arrives with a girlfriend and his own secrets. There are also friends, a gay couple hoping to adopt a baby, that seem to be in the novel to give the Posts someone else to talk to. 

if I have a issue with The Vacationers it’s the point of view, which hops around between characters and prevents any one character from being judged too harshly. (There’s plenty of bad behavior in the book, including Franny’s superb slow-boil meltdown on a beach.) Straub’s message - life is a ride best experienced with family - is a conservative one, and taking us inside everyone’s head gives the novel a soft-focus at the edges that I’m not sure Straub intended. How can we hate these people when we’ve spent so much time with them? Still, Straub has a way of cutting away to pre-vacation scenes at just the right moments and Jim’s journey back into his marriage is for me the most moving part of The Vacationers. Above average popular fiction, 3.5 stars.

ucbcomedy:

"When I was in high school I was a really huge ‘SNL’ fan. I remember the cast around the time I started watching it - Will Ferrell, Ana Gasteyer, Molly Shannon, Cheri O’Teri, Tracy Morgan. I did research to find out how people got on the show. Their bios always said they came from an improv team, so I started taking classes." - Aubrey Plaza

ucbcomedy:

"When I was in high school I was a really huge ‘SNL’ fan. I remember the cast around the time I started watching it - Will Ferrell, Ana Gasteyer, Molly Shannon, Cheri O’Teri, Tracy Morgan. I did research to find out how people got on the show. Their bios always said they came from an improv team, so I started taking classes." - Aubrey Plaza

(via aubreyplaza-is-god)

About Alex trailer….